Yeast and different carbohydrate substrates

Based on the rate of evolution of CO2 the yeast was most efficiently able to utilize the substrate Glucose, followed by Sucrose and Fructose respectively. That being said with all the substrates being of. Thus Sucrose entered more sugar and had more sugar to be used up by the reaction. However this would have taken more time to become apparent in the data because first the yeast cells would have had to break up the a-glycosidic bond found in Sucrose.

Yeast and different carbohydrate substrates

Out of the samples that did produce CO2, the mannose sample took the longest to begin producing CO2 Figure 1. It took 25 minutes until it started. Its biggest jumps in CO2 production were between the 20 minute and 25 minute, and 25 minute and 30 minute marks.

This was when right when it began producing CO2. Its CO2 production increased steadily until the 65 minute mark when production started to even out.

BSCL: Cellular Respiration. STUDY. PLAY. compare fermentation of different carbohydrates by yeast. The respirometer consist of: two test tubes, one small and one large. different carbohydrates as substrates for fermentation. Some are used more efficiently than others. Yeast And Different Carbohydrate Substrates Essay Sample. Hypothesis. The hypothesis that I draw is that “” out the five carbohydrate substrates that I will use, Glucose will produce the highest volume of Carbon Dioxide at every five-minute interval. ABSTRACT The effect of the nature of substrate on the rate of respiration of yeast was determined using the Smith fermentation tube method. 15 mL of both distilled water (H2O) and 10% yeast solution was poured in six fermentation tubes.

The fructose sample took 20 minutes to begin producing CO2, which was second fastest out of the samples that did produce CO2. The fructose had its highest CO2 production in the first three time intervals it began producing CO2.

After that it steadily increased and only seemed to slightly begin to even out production of CO2. It produced the most CO2 out of all the samples. The glucose sample started producing CO2 the earliest out of all the samples, at the 15 minute mark.

It increased production of CO2 steadily until the 45 minute mark when production suddenly spiked in production for 15 minutes. The CO2 production looked like it may have been starting to even out when recording stopped. Galactose and the control sample did not produce any CO2 at all.

They remained at 0 mL of CO2 production throughout the whole experiment.

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Discussion Prescott and co-workers took a look at the chemical reactions between microorganisms and carbohydrates. They noted that the sugars glucose, fructose, and mannose are all catabolized, or broken down, through the process of phosphorylation, which is process of adding a phosphate group to a molecule Black, Most commonly ATP adds the phosphate group to the sugar molecule, and then it is able to enter glycolysis, which is the process of breaking down a sugar.

Once in the process of glycolysis, the sugar will begin to ferment. One common byproduct of fermentation is CO2. In this experiment, glucose, fructose, and mannose were the only sugar solutions that produced CO2.

Yeast and different carbohydrate substrates

As described by Prescott and co-workersthose are the only sugars that are able to be broken down through phosphorylation. The yeast must have had ATP in it, which would have added a phosphate to the sugar molecules.

After gaining the phosphate, the sugars began to break down, ferment, and produce CO2. Prescott and co-workers also noted that in order for galactose to be catabolized, it must first go through a three-step process to be converted into a type of glucose. In the experiment, the galactose solution did not react with the yeast to produce any CO2.

This is because the galactose was not converted, so therefore it could not gain a phosphate and begin the process of phosphorylation to break down, undergo glycolysis, ferment, and produce CO2. Lastly, the control group did not produce any CO2 either. That is because there was nothing for it to react with and it was at room temperature.

If the yeast was heated, it would have given off CO2 Buchner, This academia was first published 2 Oct and last revised 17 Feb He scrapbooks yonder every minute or three. Next 1 Oct Purpose: To determine the ability of yeast to use different carbohydrate sources as a substrate for fermentation by measuring the release of carbon dioxide.

Using yeast, smith fermentation tubes and different substrates namely, starch, lactose, sucrose, glucose and fructose, which are from different kinds of carbohydrates, ranging from the simplest sugars glucose and fructose to the polysaccharide starch and water as the control, the hypothesis was tested.

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Yeast And Different Carbohydrate Substrates Essay Sample

Using yeast, smith fermentation tubes and different substrates namely, starch, lactose, sucrose, glucose and fructose, which are from different kinds of carbohydrates, ranging from the simplest sugars glucose and fructose to the polysaccharide starch and water as the control, the hypothesis was tested.

In this study, different sugar solutions were combined with a yeast solution in order to see how fast and if they react to produce CO 2. Materials and Methods A yeast solution along with three sugar solutions and laboratory instruments and supplies were distributed.

This variance led to the difference in the effect of the substrate on the yeast and the overall trends in the data was also due to the different structures of the substrates. During fermentation, the substrate is broken down (using enzymes “” to catalyse the reaction) to ethanol and Carbon Dioxide.

THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SUGARS ON THE RATE OF FERMENTATION IN YEAST